Four companies in D.C. that recently rebranded

In the world of marketing, one of the scariest and simultaneously exciting actions a company can take is to rebrand. Rebranding is a big overarching term that can mean a lot of different things, but the basic definition is to change the image of a corporation or organization. This can involve everything from changing the name, logo, tagline, colors, and design in order to create a new company identity in the minds of consumers and other companies. It can be a risky thing to rebrand, so why do companies do it? Maybe in the past years your client base or target market has changed, or your original mission statement just doesn’t fit anymore. Whatever you’re reason, rebranding can be a great way to redesign your company to fit your current needs and keep your brand fresh.

Washington, D.C. is a hotbed for both startups and old firms. Because of this, the city sees its fair share of rebranding efforts. Check out these four companies that have rebranded in D.C. in the past few years.

Snagajob is now Snag:

Snagajob, a job management company located in Arlington, V. A., rebranded itself in April of 2018 as Snag. In a Washington Business Journal article, the CEO of Snag, Peter Harrison, iterated that Snag’s mission is to connect individuals with jobs and work that fits their talents and availability, so they can “maximize their potential so they can live more fulfilling lives.” The Snag rebrand comes with a new logo and new company colors, switching from orange to purple as the primary company color. The rebrand also included a website overhaul and new app design. Check it out here.

United Social Sports is now D.C. Fray:

In February of 2017, United Social Sports, a local organization offering recreational adult sports leagues around the city, was rebranded as D.C. Fray. The company didn’t feel like the old brand lived up to their new and evolving mission to “make fun possible” and didn’t fit with the expanded services they provided, including corporate event planning, social gatherings, fitness, and original activities. Today, D.C. Fray is also the official adult social sports league of the Wizards, Capitals, Mystics and Valor. Check out their new website and logo.

SnobSwap is now LePrix:

Secondhand clothing stores are on the rise with the reaction against fast fashion, and one company that focuses on that is LePrix. The company was known as SnobSwap before March of 2018 and is a luxury secondhand startup based in D.C. SnobSwap was originally just for people swapping each others clothes, but the two co-founders wanted it to be more of a online luxury secondhand store. After the company ran a quality survey with current and potential customers, they found that 80% disliked the name SnobSwap. After that the co-founders put their efforts into rebranding the company, starting with renaming SnobSwap to LePrix, which means “the prize” in French. Their new website has a clean, minimalist vibe, which is intended to cater more towards their target market, young millennials concerned with eco-friendly fashion. Check it out here.

Skyline Innovations is now Nextility:

In 2014, Skyline Innovations in Washington, D.C. was rebranded as Nextility. The company is a leading developer and financier of solar energy and the rebrand was inspired by the company’s desire to expand their product and service offering. The same year Nextility launched an energy brokerage line of business, which helps to give small businesses a better way to buy and manage their energy consumption. Along with the name change, the company also issued a completely new logo and a website redesign, which is intended to better serve both current and new customers. Take a look for yourself here.

Final thoughts on what to consider when rebranding

Rebranding can be a intimidating process, but, as shown above, it can also be a great way to refresh your company. You might think that in a city as old as D.C. it would be hard to redesign a company image, but these companies did it successfully and even made news with their new looks and messages to consumers. If you work hard to realign your design with your customer’s expectations and exemplify your true mission, then your rebrand should pay off in the end.